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WITH THE UNIBEN FIRST CLASS LAW GRADUATE – DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE

WITH THE UNIBEN FIRST CLASS LAW GRADUATE – DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE

Post Series: uniben phenomena

…generate a broad mind to see the possibilities and capacities in everything… believe only in your own mind, believe in what you can do…

– Destiny Possible Ogedegbe

Today I will be bringing you the interview I had with Destiny Possible Ogedegbe – the second Uniben first class Law graduate.

Possible isn’t just that guy that looks peng in black and white, he is not just the author of simplified English Language and Students’ Guide to Catalytic Advocacy. He has represented his faculty in various national moot and mock competitions. Destiny Possible is also the elder brother of the popular musician- @iamharrycarter.

Furthermore, Possible Ogedegbe has achieved the feat of being the second first class graduate ever produced from UNIBEN Faculty of Law since her inception in 1981 (awesome, isn’t it?). This is a feat that was last accomplished by Mavis Abada in 2012. Possible Ogedegbe is currently a student at the Nigeria Law School in Abuja.

Destiny Possible Ogedegbe is a passionate advocate and an interesting person to converse with, I had a swell time talking with him and I also must commend his patience with answering my questions both online and offline. Below is a transcript of our juicy conversation.

uniben law graduate - destiny Possible Ogedegbe

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

Good evening, could you please introduce yourself?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE: 

My name is Osayi Possible Ogedegbe. I am from Benin, Orihonmwon Local Government.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

Hmmm, Ogedegbe sounds like a Yoruba name.

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

Not really, Yoruba has an “n” somewhere I think, but mine doesn’t.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

I get it now, could you please tell me about your family?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

 What can I say about my family? We are just five and I’m the first son- two boys and three girls, I have an elder sister. I have a very humble beginning. My mum is a trader and my Dad is a Police Prosecutor. I grew up at Upper Sakponba Road. I don’t know if you are very familiar with Benin very well, but where I grew up is a very rough place where we have a lot of vices. It’s predominantly for the poor people, so you can imagine how it was when i was growing up. My whole family grew up there. One of the advantages of growing up in such a place is that you learn how to hustle and fend for yourself very early in your life. That inspired me to be a lot of things.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

Tell me about your academic background.

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

I attended Good Foundation Primary School before I moved to Unicoach Group of Schools then I finally went to Axxess Foundation. I went to three schools- one for my Primary education, one for my Junior Secondary and another for my Senior Secondary.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

How was your performance in secondary school?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

People ask me this question a lot and most times when I want to answer I don’t know if I will sound immodest. My position right from Primary School to Senior Secondary has always been First, not  for any particular reason, but it has just always happened that way. I always took first position and for many Nigerian parents that’s a good performance right? I never paid much attention to it then, i got the normal awards and all.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

         I’m sure you ended up being their head boy.

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

        Yes, I was the Senior Prefect.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

After your Junior WAEC, I assume you moved to Art Class? Why did you choose to go to Art Class?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

I moved to Art Class in my Senior Secondary School Two and it was a tough call for me because i was extremely good in Sciences, but I moved to Art class because I didn’t like the serious atmosphere of the Sciences, I just wanted to go to a place comfortable for me.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

Did you go to Art Class with the thought of being a Lawyer?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

No, I didn’t. I knew I would eventually have to choose what I would do, but thought of being a lawyer never crossed my mind. I didn’t have the childhood dream of being a Lawyer, I was just there.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

Could you tell me about your most memorable day in secondary school?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

Hmmm, the day I became the senior prefect should be my most memorable time? I didn’t want to be a Senior Prefect. It was a routine to be called out in the hall and address the students. I still remember the words I uttered that day, I remember saying “I would expose them to the generous frontiers of human development” if I become the Senior Prefect. I can’t think of why I said it but I did and it’s still a memorable day for me.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

You mentioned not having any intention to study Law, so why did you choose Law when filling your JAMB form?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

I didn’t choose Law at first, I chose International Law and Diplomacy (ISD), then my Uncle who is a Lawyer objected, he felt I could do better with Law. He bought me a new JAMB form and tore my previous form. I basically chose Law because I was happy he had that much confidence in me. I was happy he believed I could do much more than I’d thought I could do, so I took it.

uniben law graduate - destiny possible ogedegbe

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

Moving into your Uniben days, how was 100 level for you?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

I had great friends in 100 level. I never imagined I’d make the best grade in my class but it was a moment of adventure, experience and fun for me.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

Did you engage in extra-curricular activities in school?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

Yes, I’d go to the gym, played football. As a matter of fact, I was the most valuable player in my faculty when I was in 300level. I did a lot of guy stuff. I went to end-of-year parties where necessary, I’m not a party person, so I can actually count the number of times I went to parties.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

Where did you stay in school?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

I stayed in the hostel for four years. I stayed in hall 4, then I left for Junior Staff Quarters (JSQ). I lived off campus too- I stayed at BDPA, then I came back to school. I remember staying at Ekosodin for about four months in 300level, so I had a taste of both.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

Were you a library person, night class person or in-room reader?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

I don’t think I used the library in my 5 years up to 10 times, I only use it when it’s too expedient. I didn’t use it much because I read at night. I used night class a lot and I lost a lot of phones going to night class. I used to read at Education ETF before i moved to Law due to some issues. Sometimes i read in the hostel’s common room.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

What’s the longest you have read for?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

I can hardly tell that, it depends- In Law School, I could read for a whole day, today I woke up by 5am and I read till 6pm. The more you grow, the more you become adapted to more of these things. In Uniben, it depends on how important the thing was, I could read for 8 hours at a stretch or 6 hours, but I don’t think I read for more than 10hours.

OSAYI FOLU OLUFUNKE:

Tell me about your typical day in school?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

I talk a lot, when I go to class. I have my friends, I always seat at the back and we are always talking. We have all the fun but they are all smart guys, we usually know what the lecturer is teaching before we do all that. My day is usually hectic in school, for some reasons I became very popular in school, I could go to the faculty, hang out with a lot of persons both Seniors and Juniors, fraternize with a lot of persons. I would need to meet with a lot of persons during the day and it sometimes eat into my time, and I usually have a lot to do- maybe I’m writing for someone. My typical days are always busy, only on rare occasions do i have easy days.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

Were you into any politics in school?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

No, I wasn’t political! I was more of an advocate than a politician.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

Which church did you attend in school? Did you hold any position there?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

Predominantly CU-NIFES. No, I usually don’t hold positions a lot.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

Did you have a favorite course?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

I don’t think so, I enjoyed all my courses. I can’t really pick one out and if I’m going to do that, it will be because it was too easy, but then I’m not suppose to tell you it’s my best course because it was easy. I found all of them interesting. Maybe, my best was Jurisprudence in final year, and that was because it was the most difficult, I liked it because it was challenging.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

Tell me about the challenges you faced in the University.

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

My first major challenge was financial, I remember I used to teach English Language, sometimes I won’t be in class, I would go to lectures sometimes to teach. One way or the other, I was always looking for money until I published my first English textbook, I stopped teaching then and started selling the books. I did a lot of menial jobs in school- bricklaying, I worked at car-washes just to get money. Then secondly, I had academic challenges, sometimes a course can be very tasking maybe because I didn’t have enough time for them or they just didn’t intrinsically sink into my system, but I won’t be able to complain about it because people wouldn’t believe me. I also had emotional challenges, I entered a relationship in my 300level.

uniben law graduate - destiny possible ogedegbe

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

How were you able to deal with the emotion and still be focused on your academics?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

Emotional challenges are unavoidable in a relationship. It was hard, I won’t pretend it wasn’t. It was difficult to balance, but what helped me deal with it was discipline. I just knew somewhere within my mind that, whatever I was doing, whoever I was with, I still have my books to read. it’s a matter of discipline, being disciplined about the things that you are passionate about, you can always balance it. Discipline was the only thing that helped me, apart from that I really don’t see anything that can help anyone when faced with emotional challenges.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

How good were you in managing your time?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

I am very very good with time, it still boils down to discipline. I stick to my plans, and knowing how to manage my time really helped me.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

I understand Law has different areas, where do you think you will branch to?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

For now, I can’t really say the position I’d find myself because Law is very wide and sometimes you will find yourself doing well in a lot of areas and you will find it difficult to choose. But, I think, I would want to start from a Law firm where I can touch different areas. I understand there are lot of Law firms where when you get employed, you are allowed to work in different departments, before you eventually pick a particular area to specialize in. In  the long run from now, I think I would specialize in Criminal and Civil Litigation.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

So far, how has Law school been for you?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

Well, Law school is a world of its own, its a highly intellectual ground. It is a place where everything revolves around academics, you practically read almost every hour of the day and you only have few hours to do very little things. When I newly came here, it was very overwhelming, lot of things tp do, lot of books to read, you basically read every night for the next day and you read volumes and volumes of textbooks. Generally, it has been nice and really insightful, I have learnt a lot of things that have made me even more confidence in the legal profession.

I have my friends from Uniben here and they make it really easy for me and I also have great lecturers who are mentors, who I look up to. I look forward to classes because I love law so much. Apart from the reading, friends, there is not much to say about the Law school, it is just a place where anybody can get overwhelmed with the academic work and you get to learn a lot of stuff. It is a leveler for us, it is like our barrack as Lawyers, this is where we learn Law itself and for me it has been a great experience. Law school is a place to be, not twice anyway.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

Not to take your time any further, what advice do you have for undergraduates?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

I think most Undergraduates do not understand the things they can do with their mind. Many students don’t train themselves enough to appreciate the capacity and ability they possess. A lot of persons don’t understand how powerful their minds are and that is because of their over reliance on the experiences of others. People tell you something is difficult, people tell you this is the way something is, people don’t have the ability to challenge the status quo.

My advice to Students is to consciously try to develop a broad mind, they must generate a broad mind to see the possibilities and capacities in everything they do. When reading a course, they should be able to see the possibility of an “A” in that course, they shouldn’t place so much reliance on what people tell you or the experiences your seniors have had. Believe only in your own mind, believe in what you can do. I found out that there are lot of things a student can do with their mind, as a young person, you can be extremely brilliant but most times we don’t know that. students should keep moving and keep trying to develop your mental state, develop both the thinking and their reading culture.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

hmmm…

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

Many Nigerian Students are averagely intelligent, all you need to do is just to do a little bit more that everybody does and you are already better than a lot of persons. Nigerian Students have a low tolerance for serious work, that is why anyone who goes a little bit higher than the average always does better. Education in Nigeria is troubled already, students should look beyond just having formal education, students should look into developing themselves, not just their academic life. They should develop other aspect of their lives that will cumulatively join efforts in making them better persons in the society.

FOLU OLUFUNKE:

Thanks for taking out time to grant this interview despite your busy schedule. How can people connect with you?

DESTINY POSSIBLE OGEDEGBE:

You are very much welcome. My Instagram and Twitter handle is “Mr_possidez”.

I gained some insights while conversing with Possible Ogedegbe, mostly on discipline and time management – he told me we would talk by 8 o’clock and despite the network issue he still kept to it, but that isn’t the best part, some minutes after we talked, I tried asking him about something I left out during the interview and he was already back to his books. Show me a man who religiously keeps to his time and i will show you Osayi Possible Ogedegbe.

I hope you learnt something(s) from the transcript of my conversation with this Uniben Scholar, behind the starched and sparkling white shirt and well ironed trouser is a man who hustled in school for money, a man who read his books religiously and managed his time well. Like he said, remember that one of the keys to being extraordinary is you sprinkling a little bit of effort in your endeavors and broadening your mind. 

School is not a scam if you read, Destiny Possible Ogedegbe could do it, so what is stopping you?

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-don’t just be great, be phenomenal!

 

 

 

Folu Olufunke

Folu Olufunke is a writer, curriculum developer and an educationist. When she isn't scouting for the next juicy story to bring here, you'll find her neck deep in her books or advocating for quality education for all

This Post Has 2 Comments
    1. it’s good to know you find it intriguing.
      I hope to see more of you here, do subscribe to our newsletter to stay updated.

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